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Old 10-24-2002, 07:49 PM   #41
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Lindil-thank you greatly for the informative response
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Old 10-24-2002, 08:04 PM   #42
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Aiwendil-thank you also for your post, I didn't see it the first time around. However, you say:
Quote:
I think it can be pretty well demonstrated that Elvish names are in fact repeated.
I took this to mean that Tolkien didn't mind repeating names, because of the stress. Indeed names are repearted, but JRR writes in the second essay on the Glorfindels in The Peoples of Middle-Earth: "This repition of so striking a name, though possible, would not be credible. No other major character in the Elvish legends reported in The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings has a name borne by another Elvish person of importance."

Thus, two important people shouldn't have the same name; although the first Legolas doesn't have prominent importance, with this context, it wouldn't make sense for an important later elf to have the name. The Lorien Rumil is fine, because even though the Rumil who invented the first Tengwar is important, the later one isn't at all.
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Old 10-24-2002, 09:53 PM   #43
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I agree that the statement: "This repition of so striking a name, though possible, would not be credible. No other major character in the Elvish legends reported in The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings has a name borne by another Elvish person of importance" cannot be dismissed. However:

1. I don't think that the Third Age Legolas was anywhere near as important a character in the mythology as was Glorfindel. That he was a major character in LotR does not mean that he was of great importance to the Legendarium as a whole.

2. I think your reasoning is backwards: you seem to say that a non-important Elf can repeat the name of an important Elf but not vice versa. But surely it cannot be known with any certainty how important an Elf will be at the time when he or she is named. Thranduil would not have said "I think my son's going to be important in days to come. Better not name name him after anybody."

The reverse, rather, would seem to be the case (and this fits very well with my hypothesis in my previous post). If Elf A is not important or well known, Elf B may very well be given the same name, not in imitation of or tribute to Elf A, but independently. But if Elf A is famous, his or her name will be well known, and Elf B will not be given that same name, because it is already an "important name". This can be summed up succinctly: Elf-parents do not tend to give their children names of important (well-known) Elves.

The one problem with this is Rumil. This is a problem, in any case though; certainly Rumil was already the name of an important Elf, and ought not to have been repeated. Apparently there were some that did not follow this rule (or perhaps the rustic Silvan Elves hadn't heard of Rumil the Sage!)

[ November 07, 2003: Message edited by: Aiwendil ]
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Old 10-24-2002, 10:04 PM   #44
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Also possibly various clans Sylvan or Sindar or Noldor used names from other clans.
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Old 02-03-2007, 05:54 AM   #45
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According to PE XIII, the noldorissa form is Legolas, and the eldarissa Laiqalasse. In parentheses appear translation 'Green Leaf' and the form Leiqualassė.
There is no occurrence of an additional meaning, or of another form, or of a mix of two names, so Legolast and Laigolas may be rejected. A qenya form would be unsuited, but a pure sindarin form would be too. Legolas is said from the House of Tree, is a goldogrin name, and in the context of the composition of the Lost Tales, we must assume he is of gnomish origin. But we know, in the later phases of composition, that the sindarin names of Exiles, are not pure but are 'sindarization' from quenya or amanya telerin ; choosing a pure sindarin form like Laegolas doesn't seem to me to be good solution, all the more the Sindar of Gondolin are form Nevrast, they must speak the north sindarin, not the traditional speech.

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Old 02-11-2007, 03:56 PM   #46
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I was not jet a member of teh forum when the discussion was fought out. But I have certainly read it and made my mind up about the problem of {Legolas}[Laegolas]. Since this seems to come up know I will add my two cent to the discussion.

{Legolas}[Laegolas] is a acceptable change for me, especially since it is linguistcally argued. A more substantial change would not have found my approval. I would have tried to change the group decision earlier if the vote had been for a more substantial change.
My reason for this is not linguistcal but purely for reasons of possible interpretetion, which we should not contradict: I am not as sure as other members in the forum that Legolas of Gondolin and Legolas of Grennwood are diffrent elves. That is not saying that I am absoltue sure that they are one and the same, but I see a possibilty that they could be (and a chance much greater than one to a billion, which Lindil once mentioned). Therefore I think our text should be ambigious in this matter. That would allow a linguistcal change like {Legolas}[Laegolas] but nothing more.

As an aside not: Is {Legolas}[Laegolas] a change in the spelling in the elvish script at all or is it just a change of pronounciation?

aravanessė, I did understand your argument agianst pure Sindarin, but I do not quiet agree to it. Noldorin as it was when The Fall of Gondolin was written, is clearly not the language JRR Tolkien later in his life envisaged for the Noldor in Beleriand to have ever spoken. Such a speech existed probably in Tolkiens mind, but it was not the earlier Noldorin of The Lost Tales. Any way it would be help full to hear your positive arguments for the change or no change for the name Legolas.

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Old 02-12-2007, 03:05 PM   #47
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Positive arguments? What is it? Arguments in favour of Legolas (not against the other suggestions) ?

Quote:
My reason for this is not linguistcal but purely for reasons of possible interpretetion, which we should not contradict: I am not as sure as other members in the forum that Legolas of Gondolin and Legolas of Grennwood are diffrent elves. That is not saying that I am absoltue sure that they are one and the same, but I see a possibilty that they could be (and a chance much greater than one to a billion, which Lindil once mentioned). Therefore I think our text should be ambigious in this matter. That would allow a linguistcal change like {Legolas}[Laegolas] but nothing more.
I agree with the development, but more categorical in my conclusion. As you say, the two Legolas could be the same (even though the possibility is tenuous), it seems to me logical that they bear the same name, not a variant. The respect of the name in the elvish society is very important (See the ire of Fëanor against the change of Therindë/Serindë, or his jests about Hwëanáro/Hwinwë which should stand in vanyarin, or the ceremonies about names-attribution).
Moreover, a same name for two different persons is not so uncommon : Galdor seems to be in this case, but the name Ingoldo also, and a lot of Stewards (with heroes of First Age), Míriel, Ambarussa, Finwë, Maidros, Gildor, Haldir, Rúmil,… So why changing the name chosen by Tolkien ? And Oropher is from sindarin ascendancy and was born before the destruction of Beleriand (if my memory is good), he must know the story of Gondolin and Thranduil too, it could be reasonable to imagine him giving the name of this well-known hero to his son.

Quote:
As an aside not: Is {Legolas}[Laegolas] a change in the spelling in the elvish script at all or is it just a change of pronounciation?
'Just' a change of pronunciation ? It is too much for me. And /ae/ and /e/ are written differently in tengwar, see the King's Letters. It is a change of the substance of the name, not only of the outside.

Quote:
aravanessë, I did understand your argument agianst pure Sindarin, but I do not quiet agree to it. Noldorin as it was when The Fall of Gondolin was written, is clearly not the language JRR Tolkien later in his life envisaged for the Noldor in Beleriand to have ever spoken. Such a speech existed probably in Tolkiens mind, but it was not the earlier Noldorin of The Lost Tales. Any way it would be help full to hear your positive arguments for the change or no change for the name Legolas.
I'm not sure to understand… You want to say gnomish is not the language Tolkien envisage for the Noldor in the later texts? If it is this, I think it isn't a problem, we know gnomish and sindarin dialects, the languages adopted by the Noldor in Exil in later phases of composition, are close linked as for vocabulary, and we know Legolas is attested in gnomish and in sindarin.

It is long and difficult to speak English, and I can't express exactly what I want to say. Rhhhh !

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Old 02-13-2007, 01:43 AM   #48
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Quote:
It is long and difficult to speech English, and I can't express exactly what I want to say. Rhhhh !
This is at least a problem we share.

About pronunciation: Ma own name does never change in spelling, but when I move to a country speaking a different language, even one in the same group of languages e.g. English, the pronunciation will change.

If we now consider for a moment that the two Legolas' were one and the same, then we see him move from a country speaking a northern dialect of Sindarin enriched by Quenya words (Gondolin) to a country of speaking a fare removed Silvian dialect which is slowly sindarizied by the influence of his father and grandfather and the contact with other communities over a time span of 3000 years.

Under such circumstances I think that a slight change in the pronunciation is at least possible if not probable. Since we also can consider that in Gondolin the Fėanorien Tengwar was used and in Mircwood the elves tended rather to the Cirth a appropriate change of spelling seems possible as well.

That is not to say that I would not argue for not changing the name if we really reopen that choice, put I am a bit reluctant to through away the old decision, since many of the old members which discussed and voted on this one are no longer active and will not take part in a new discussion. So what I do really is teasing you to bring forth your arguments as compelling as possible to turn at least all the active members over to your side not only me.

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Old 02-13-2007, 07:30 AM   #49
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Oh! From which country do yo come from ?
I agree with you, but who/where are the active members I have to convince? I will take a malicious delight in it.

Quote:
About pronunciation: Ma own name does never change in spelling, but when I move to a country speaking a different language, even one in the same group of languages e.g. English, the pronunciation will change.

If we now consider for a moment that the two Legolas' were one and the same, then we see him move from a country speaking a northern dialect of Sindarin enriched by Quenya words (Gondolin) to a country of speaking a fare removed Silvian dialect which is slowly sindarizied by the influence of his father and grandfather and the contact with other communities over a time span of 3000 years.
Under such circumstances I think that a slight change in the pronunciation is at least possible if not probable. Since we also can consider that in Gondolin the Fėanorien Tengwar was used and in Mircwood the elves tended rather to the Cirth a appropriate change of spelling seems possible as well.
Yeah I had not thought about this possibility.
Personally, I respect the pronunciation of 'Julian' in Deutsch when my correspondant come at home. But it is my own experience, not a generality, I concede.
In Gondolin, 'gondolinic runes' were used according to Tolkien-compositions from 1920-30. And the difference is made between /e/ and /ae/ in both systems (gondolinic and runic).
Oropher, the grand-father, is one of the iathrim, I think he speaks a good sindarin, and continue to call his grand-son by his right name if the others Tawarwaith dont do so.

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Old 02-14-2007, 06:24 AM   #50
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I am from Germany and have to travel in my job regularly to France, and the USA. I also have visited Scotland, Brazil, the Netherlands and Denmark. The Brazilians were as a rule not able to pronounce my first Name “Ralf” in any recognisable way (to safe the day for the Brazilians, I did meet there a lot of people that had some knowledge of German and spoke it fluent alongside a good pronunciation of my name, but many of them had German ancestors). The Danish and Netherlands have no problem with “Ralf” but the native English speakers tend to change the sound of the vocal. But as you do with the German pronunciation of Julian, I accept the English pronunciation of “Ralf”. It is hard for people to change their habit of speaking and would only lead to lesser flow in communication. I think that this is quiet common, but who knows?

As an example of even greater changes take the names Charles and Henry corresponding to German Karl and Heinrich.

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P.S.: As fare as I can see the active members in the moment are Aiwendil, Maédhros, you and me. But if you look at this thread you will find a lot more names who had all taken part in the first round of discussion and many of them had also voted. In all the time I am at the project we never had a vote, but voting was more common at the start of the project, when much more members were active and an agreement of all was much harder to reach. Some time Aiwendil Maédhros and I discussed about the old votes and what we would do if we would reach a point were the result of such an old vote becomes doubt full. But I am not sure if we had come to a conclusion.
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Old 02-19-2007, 11:59 PM   #51
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I do not at all see how Legolas [LotR] could be one and the same unless you discount everything said in UT about Thranduil being the son of Orophir and thus Kin to the SIndarin Celeborn.

Legolas in LotR simply never lived in Beleriand [unlike Glorfindel - who could have and I think in XII does, but w/ small reservations on JRRT's part], does he not say somewhere in XII, ok I went out to the garage to get XII.

On p. 379:
Quote:
and if [glorfindel] was a cheiftan of the City he must have been a noldo
Also we have the Orophir being painted as a very partisan and grudge holding Doriathrim. SO much so that seemingly Thranduil his son cuts off contact w/ Lorien because of the Noldorin taint!

So unless we disregard UT [all late writings] and XII's 'late writings' Legolas as Gondolinite is 100% out. I am sure someone here can come up a better case than that [if need be].
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Old 02-20-2007, 02:53 PM   #52
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Okay, if it is wanted I will add a further information of how I see it as possible that Legolas of Gondolin and Legolas of Mirkwood are one and the same person.

My main arguments for Legolas being older as normaly acounted comes from The Lord of the Ring:
1. Legolas tells that only in Fangorn he feels young again since wandering with the companions. Considering that just before he had meet such old elves like Galadriel and Celeborn makes it very suspicious that he is as young as many see him.
2. In Moria he is beside Gandalf the only one and he is the first to identify the Balrog as what he is. Compare that to Aragorn. He has been educated in the last High-elven refuge. But even after hearing Gandalf and Legolas name the demon he does not use that name when telling about it in Lorien. For me that means he has never heard before about Balrogs at all. Therefore this matter seems not to be anything Elves thought their children or young warriors. At least this should make us suspicious about the curriculum viėta of Thranduil and Oropher. Doriathrim had never any known contact to Balrogs in the wars of Beleriand. How would they get a knowledge good enough to educate Legolas so that he could identify the Balrog at once?

A further point is added by The Unfinished Tales: There we are told about the feelings of Thranduil after the war of the Last Alliance. That he did know that the peace would not last for ever and that he was anguish when ever he thought about Mordor. And all what we hear seems to me to contradict that he could have had a child in the third age.

Now all these points would be solved at once when Legolas of Gondolin and Legolas of Mirkwood would be one and the same. But that would of course need a special viėta for Thranduil his father. If we assume for the reason of a possibility check that the Legolases are only one Legoas and that he is the son of Thranduil. Than Thranduil would need the following viėta:

Oropher was a Elf from Doriath and he stayed their until its final downfall in the fight against the Fėanorians. (From this his embitterment against the Noldor.) I assume that he fled to Ossiriand but that is only a guess.
Thranduil seems also to have been witnessed the building of Menegroth, since he build his own fortress very similar to it. Which probably meant he was born in the early days of Doriath. In the long time of peace that followed the building of Menegroth he wandered into the north and settled in Nevrast, were he stayed until he moved with Turgon to Gondolin. In Gondolin Legolas was born (since he never had heard the cry of the gulls he can not have been born in Nevrast).
After the Fall of Gondolin Thranduil and Legolas separated from the fugitives of Gondolin (possibly when Tuor deicide to move from Nan-Tathren to Sirions mouth) and went in search of Oropher. (If we assume that they found him in Ossiriand, than we might have found the missing link, that triggered the move of Nimloth with Elwing from Ossiriand to Sirions mouth.) From That point onward the story is more or less given in UT beside the fact that Legolas was all the time with his father and grandfather.

I know very well that this viėta of Thranduil is pressed to fit the assumption that Legolas of Mirkwood was in Gondolin, but since we did not find any clear no go in this way, such a viėta is possible even if improbable. I do not say that is how it was, but I say that is one possibility how it could have been.

For me the faint possibility given above is enough to deny any drastic change of the name.

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Old 06-14-2007, 09:13 AM   #53
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Wouldn't one need to keep Legolas out of 'New Ossiriand' as well? considering that it became a seaside kingdom.

The first entry in Appendix B for the Second Age concerns the Foundation of Lindon and the Grey Havens. The text concerning the Sindar and Thranduil appears just before the entries begin of course, including information about who lived in this 'new' Lindon (called the 'Kingdom of Lindon' in drafts).

The Second Age

'(...) In the beginning of this Age many of the High Elves still remained. Most of these dwelt in Lindon west of the Ered Luin; but before the building of the Barad-dūr many of the Sindar passed eastward, and some established realms in the forests far away, where their people were mostly Silvan Elves. Thranduil, king in the North of Greenwood the Great, was one of these. In Lindon north of the Lune...' The Return of the King Appendix B

Here I think the suggestion is that the Sindar dwelt in Lindon at this time, but at some point before the building of the Barad-dūr, Thranduil and others went East and etc. I guess one might argue that if he left before the building of the Barad-dūr it could have been well before, despite that the context seems to imply (to my mind) 'sometime after they lived in Lindon, but yet before the building of the Barad-dūr'. According to Appendix B this span is about one thousand years.

Compare to another description in Of The Rings Of Power And The Third Age (noting the sequence of description): the destruction of Beleriand is described, Ossiriand is explained: 'that country had of old been named Lindon'. Next: 'Upon the Shores of the Gulf of Lhūn the Elves built their havens...' and then comes...

'Others of the Eldar there were who crossed the mountains of Ered Luin in this age and passed into the inner lands. Many of these were Teleri, survivors of Doriath and Ossiriand; and they established realms among the Silvan Elves in woods and mountains far from the sea,...' Of The Rings Of Power And The Third Age

Here these Eldar are said to have crossed the Ered Luin in this Age, and the new realms established are far from the Sea.

For interest maybe, in the drafts 'Remnants of the Telerian Elves (of Doriath in ancient Beleriand) establish realms in the woodlands far eastward...' is under the entry for Second Age 750 (Thranduil is mentioned). Obviously this version contains details that were changed in any case, but it still seems to me, from the overall texts, that these Elves began the Second Age in Lindon.
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Old 06-15-2007, 01:55 AM   #54
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You make a realy good point, Galin.

I have to confess that the passages in Unfinished Tales dominated my view in which the reasons for Oropher leaving Lindon were described: He did not want to live under the domination of the Noldor. If I remember correctly Lindon was more or less split in two halfes, the south dominated by Sindar and the north dominated by Noldor. But all was contorlled by Gil-galad the last High King of the Noldor. Thus I assumed that Oropher would have gone as soon as Gil-Galad established his kingdom in Lindon. But from what you have shown this is doubtfull.

Thus I have to agree that we must assume that Thranduil and, if he was already in being, Legols lived for some time (510 FA to 700 SA) in South Lindon.
In this 780 years the country of Lindon was about 700 year a seaside country. It is likly from the map in The Lord of the Rings that in all Lindon seagulls could be heared. Even if I could argue that before the Downfall of Nśmenor Lindon might have been much wider, this would not help since the Gulf of Luhn was there from the start and would suffice for gulls coming over all Lindon.

Now the only explaination I could offer is a bit fare fetched:
In the passages of HOME 12 SA 700 we get the impression that it was Thranduil who established the Relam in Mirkwood. But from UT we know that it realy was his father Oropher. Assuming that the annals of that time were later compendiums of mixed sources it could be that the information lying behind that § are:
- In SA 700 some Telerin Elves left Lindon, one of them was Thranduil.
- Later it was know that they were Lords of relams in the dale of Anduin. Thranduil in the North of Mirkwood and Celeborn in Lorien.

From this point of view we could assume that Oropher left Lindon when Gil-galad etsablished his Kingdom and went east to south mirkwood. He is clearly depicted to be an Sindarin loath of the Noldor and it would be fitting for such a one to leave Lindon so early.
In SA 700 Amdķr the father of Amroth left Lindon and established Lorien. With him went Thranduil to join again his father.

Since Gil-galad established Lindon in SA 1 and we must assume that Beleriand did not sink all of a sudden, it could be that at this early times no Seagulls could be heard in Lindon (or at least in part of it lets say the feet of the Ered Lindon). So we could think that Legolas this time follwoed his grandfather rather then staying with his father how is reported to leave in SA 700.

Please keep in mind that I am not saying that is how it was, I just say it could have been so. And that is sufficient for me not to change the name. The slight spelling update to Laegolas is for me already hard at the boundery, but still acceptable.

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Old 07-02-2007, 12:12 AM   #55
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Aiwendil makes persuasive points. Nevertheless, it makes sense to nolderize and modify the earlier personage in order to avoid confusion or debates about reincarnations ala Glorfindel. I think we all know that JRRT simply reused a name he liked and had never worked out all of the etymology and progressions respective to his later refinements of Telerian and other tongues and naming customs.

Also, since the Sindar were prevalent if not predominant among Turgon's people, could not the earlier Legolas be attributed to a Sindarin house, and then one might say that the Gray-elves of Middle-Earth were not so strict about the reoccurrence of names.

As for Legolas of Mirkwood, we know nothing positive about his maternal lineage or when he was born. It seems fair to say he was chosen for the Fellowship because he was representative of Elves as they still existed and to some degree flourished in Middle-Earth in the Third Age; even though technically an Eldar, in LoTR his Eldarin nature is at best downplayed. So, I've always assumed that he also would have had Laiquendi or Nandorin ancestors as well, though not necessarily Avari. Also, while he was unimaginably ancient by our reckoning, he was not among those that had seen the happenings of previous ages. So, again, I have assumed that at the oldest he belongs to the generation of Elrond's children, or perhaps even later, such that he might be only a mere thousand or so years old at the time of Fellowship, where he remarks on how even in his time he had travelled very little, especially not anywhere near the extent of Aragorn in his then roughly 90 years.
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Old 07-03-2007, 05:02 AM   #56
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In the end, all reasoning falls short. What we have as jet is:

- A vote from old times for changing "{Legolas}[Laegolas]"
- As far as I see two newer participants in the discussion that would vote for "Legolas", but not any of the old voters has shown even the smallest sign that he would take his vote back based on any argument brought forth

That means at least for the time being that we have to keep "{Legolas}[Laegols]".

But for the sack of the discussion:
Posted by Man-of-the-Wold:
Quote:
As for Legolas of Mirkwood, we know nothing positive about his maternal lineage or when he was born. It seems fair to say he was chosen for the Fellowship because he was representative of Elves as they still existed and to some degree flourished in Middle-Earth in the Third Age; even though technically an Eldar, in LoTR his Eldarin nature is at best downplayed.
I agree on this point, but he had not dinieable Sindarin roots by his father and Grandfather. Thus your further conclusion is not compelling to me. Specially since Oropher clearly down played his own being as Sindar as well.

Posted by Man-of-the-Wold:
Quote:
Also, while he was unimaginably ancient by our reckoning, he was not among those that had seen the happenings of previous ages.
This assumption is exactly the crux we have to deal with. Why? What made you feel he was a young Elf, as they count years? I find it very difficult to deal with this typ of overall impresion that people often bring forth in support of this argument. We have to keep in mind that we are dealing with a immortal race. Open mindness and continous interest in the wonders of the wide world might be considered as the special features that brought Legoals of Mircwood into the Fellowship of the Ring.

As jet I have not heard any argument that would give a no go for the possibility I showed of Legolas of Gondolin being the same person as Legolas of Mircwood. That alone is an interesting fact, if I consider that more than one of the old voters made it cristally clear that they dinied even the slightest possibilty of this. Were are now the persuasive line of argumentaion on which they base their sure assumption?

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Old 07-03-2007, 06:04 AM   #57
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Just to explain, I didn't vote on any form of the name thinking that this was voted on long ago in any case.

As for naming customs I have written a 'summation' based on passages from HME X and HME XII, which includes a bit on the repetition of names among Elves. Most here probably know the details, but I don't think the following example has been raised in the thread (the text about the name Glorfindel has been raised of course) so, just for possible interest...

It concerns the valour of an Elf with a Quenya name: Tolkien states that Aracáno never changed his name to Sindarin form (especially when slain so early in the history of the Exiles) but the name Argon (the Sindarin form): '... was often given as a name by Noldor and Sindar in memory of his valour.' The Shibboleth of Feanor, The Peoples of Middle-earth
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Old 07-05-2007, 11:56 PM   #58
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In response to Findegil, Legolas' Sindarin ancestry is "undeniable" and would still be true even his mother were of the Nandor, like presumably Nimrodel.

Nevertheless, until one gets to the appendices of LotR, Legolas comes across as very much the wood elf, chosen as the representative of the Elfin race, and not as one of the great and wise to possibly bring special abilities to aid the ringbearer, as Elrond considers in the context of possibly selecting one from among his own household.

I cannot tell what of my other conclusions is unaccepted.

Judgment and impression is all one has sometimes. Facts and hard evidence are hard to come by.

But the fact that Legolas talks about hardly ever having ventured beyond Mirkwood, and that his father (though a elven lord) is not even a member of the White Council or necessarily accounted among the Wise at the time of the Necromancer's expulsion from Dol Guldor might suggest that Legolas was not present during the Goblin Wars. If he had been around for the Last Alliance, it seems strange that such great lore and experience does not arise in the narrative of the LotR.

Yes, one must keep in mind that other possibilities exist when conclusons are based on supposition and circumstantial or partial evidence, but still the perponderance of evidence and intuition suggest that the Legolas of the published and finished work is a character of the Third Age, which by the time of the WotR had had a long and rich history, already.

But if voting, I'd vote for a variant name for the personage of Gondolin.
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Old 07-08-2007, 03:43 AM   #59
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Posted by Man-of-the-Wold:
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Nevertheless, until one gets to the appendices of LotR, Legolas comes across as very much the wood elf, chosen as the representative of the Elfin race, and not as one of the great and wise to possibly bring special abilities to aid the ringbearer, as Elrond considers in the context of possibly selecting one from among his own household.
Agreed completly. But to have a long and complicate history behind makes him in my view an even better representative of the Elven-race in general. We should not make the mistake to think that being in Gondolin would make Legolas at once one of the very improtant Wise elfes of Middle-Earth. The role that Legolas of Gondolin playes in the Battle does not show him as one of the councilmembers of Turgon or one of the great heros of the Battle. He is just a kind of pathfinder in the dark, that does a good job in guiding the host of fugitives over the plian in the dark.

Posted by Man-of-the-Wold:
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I cannot tell what of my other conclusions is unaccepted.
Judgment and impression is all one has sometimes. Facts and hard evidence are hard to come by.
Non of your conclusions are unacceptable, but also no of them is forcing. To make up your mind about Legolas is one of the tasks that a reader has to undertake, and the results are often quiet diffrent and should be so. Our work is not meant and should not end any such Discussion as this if it is not neccesary for the forming of the text we are willing to produce. If all evidence allows for more than on interpretation of a charachter that is fine and should be so in our version of The translation from the Elvish as well.

Posted by Man-of-the-Wold:
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But the fact that Legolas talks about hardly ever having ventured beyond Mirkwood, and that his father (though a elven lord) is not even a member of the White Council or necessarily accounted among the Wise at the time of the Necromancer's expulsion from Dol Guldor might suggest that Legolas was not present during the Goblin Wars. If he had been around for the Last Alliance, it seems strange that such great lore and experience does not arise in the narrative of the LotR.
I agree that Legolas was porbably not in the war of the last Alliance, but their could very good reason for that: After all his father and Grandfather went to that daedly war. Some one has to be left behind as a steward to guard the realm and a hier of the throne is a probable choise for this. Especially if he knows as Legolas did for sure what so ever his former history has been, that the Elves were alowed to sail West and how and were this could be done.

It is true that Legolas does not come over as the very old and expirenced Elf all the time in LotR. But he as some other minor charachters in the book go through some development after wards. A very prominent excample of this is Celeborn. When the main body of the text was written he was clearly a Woodelven Lord who had never left his realm. His wife, one of the great of the noldor had come to him and he had kissed here to stay. In the Appendix he is already changed to one of the Sindarin rulers of Woodelven relams and a relativ of King Elwe Thingol. Later on Tolkien considered and even more drastical change to a Telerin Prince from Valinor.
Or take Galdor of the Havens, he is a meassenger of Círdan in the text and nothing more is said about him. Later on we hear in Tolkiens late writing that he was one and the same Galdor of the Tree, one of the greatest heros of the Fall of Gondolin.

Posted by Man-of-the-Wold:
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Nevertheless, it makes sense to nolderize and modify the earlier personage in order to avoid confusion or debates about reincarnations ala Glorfindel.
Is it our aime to ripe readers of our text of this confusion and debates that we so much enjoy? I don't think so! If our sources by our best judgement hold still the potential for such confusion and debate it is our task to preserve it. Christopher Tolkien had set in his work all this things straight. But that lead to a thiner book and to the wish of a 'Rivised Silmarillion'.

I see this a point were in the end we have to say, 'we do not know for sure'. And in such a case our text should not strenghten one side or the other.

Therefore I would vote for keping Legolas as it is, if the voting would be reoppend. But as I said before the change {Legolas}[Laegols] is acceptable for me, even so it is on the boundary.

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Last edited by Findegil; 07-18-2007 at 05:50 AM.
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Old 08-11-2008, 09:17 AM   #60
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I say keep legolas because hes my hero and its my screen name!
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Old 08-25-2008, 01:25 PM   #61
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You are not serious ? Anyway, is the project dead ? Or is it perpetuating on a hidden forum ?

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Old 08-26-2008, 07:53 AM   #62
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When do you consider a project dead, aravanessė?

There is nothing going on in members only forum. So yes, it is a very long time since the last real discussion had brought the project any step forward.

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Old 08-27-2008, 08:05 AM   #63
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I would say the project is in one of its many long periods of hibernation.
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Old 12-22-2008, 03:44 PM   #64
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Ok, I am relieved ! Good luck !

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