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Old 05-29-2008, 11:22 AM   #121
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It wasn't good.
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Old 05-30-2008, 05:12 AM   #122
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yes it was....
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Old 09-18-2008, 06:39 PM   #123
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I laughed and I cried... at how much it sucked.
But it was entertaining, in its own unique way.

They made Sam look like be got hit in the face with a brick, or an ugly stick. He was SO badly portrayed. And he was stupid and had an annoying voice too.

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Old 09-23-2008, 08:15 AM   #124
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I remember seeing it when it first came out and I thought it was really, really cool.

Then, I watched it again a few years ago. I'd picked up the VHS tape at the library and brought it home to show my wife who'd never seen it before.
A few minutes into the movie, I said, "Don't worry... it gets better".
Then, a few minutes after that, I said, "No... I don't think it does", and stopped the film.

Sorry, it just did not stand the test of time for me.
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Old 02-12-2009, 08:39 AM   #125
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In the cartoon version of The Hobbit, Bilbo looked like a Cabbage Patch Kid, Gollum looked like the toad I stepped on last week, and the scene where Bilbo kills the spiders was just weird. I mean, what was with the whole spinning camera effect? Coudn't they have just shown the spiders' visions blurring or fading to back? I almost had an epileptic seizure from watching it!
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Old 02-13-2009, 05:56 AM   #126
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such an interesting discussion!

I remember, a few years ago "Entertainment Weekly" ran a sidebar about Bakshi, and I got the impression that he didn't get to make the movie he wanted. It seems he and Saul Zaentz didn't see eye to eye on a lot. It's too bad--his animated "LotR" has the bones of a good movie, but the flaws are so huge and obvious, it makes it more difficult to appreciate the good aspects. Is that the one where the Ringwraiths are flying around on winged horses? Or is that the Rankin/Bass "RotK"? Anyway, that's probably the bottom of the barrel for me. And the orcs. And Sam. And everything else that everyone's already mentioned.

Rankin/Bass' "The Hobbit" was my true intro. to Tolkien--I saw it on TV when I was a kid. I remember being very impressed by Gollum (more true to the book than Jackson's), and for some reason always remembered the line "Deucedly fine blade." I just watched it again right after re-reading the book, and it's not quite as accurate as I'd remembered. I still think it was a good adaptation--all the essentials were there, and the changes generally helped the story along.

The R/B "RotK," on the other hand, is easily the worst adaptation I've ever seen. Any value, for me, is purely ironic (and there's not quite enough of that, either). "Is there some hobbit in YOU? IS THERE???" Pleeeeeease! I have to say, I tend to be a purist about these things, but I much preferred Peter Jackson's interpretation of Eowyn slaying the Witch King to the technically more accurate one in the R/B cartoon. The "foul dwimmerlaik" line just didn't work for me, whereas Miranda Otto did such a KILLER job displaying the emotions Tolkien describes in the book (you can even see the tears on her cheeks--a critical character element).

So, on a scale of 1-10, "Hobbit"-6, "LotR"-4, "RotK"-1.
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Old 05-18-2009, 06:05 AM   #127
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I first saw this film back in 1982 I think, either on video or terrestrial TV.

Back then, before the age of home computers, video games, sfx & cgi, I thought it was pretty good for what it was. Okay so the finished product was pretty poor compared to today's slick offerings, and the story wandered from the straight & narrow on more than just one occasion. Plus the visual interpretation of some of the characters were so at odds with how my own imagination had "seen" then from the books.

But for all those failings I still enjoyed it. Although having said that the last time I watched it was 15 years ago and I think I was a little more scathing back then. But it was still a pleasure to listen to some of the actors such as John Hurt as Aragorn, Michael Graham Cox as Boromir, Anthony Daniels' Legolas & the remarkable Peter Woodthorpe as Gollum (both Cox & Woodthorpe reprised their roles for the BBC radio adaption, and Woodthorpe's interpretation of radio Gollum was exceptional)

If I remember, I'll have to watch it again soon, if only to rather unfairingly compare it to Jackson's multimillion dollar extravaganza and hopefully watch it all the way through without either becoming bored or riddled with mirth
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Old 05-29-2009, 09:43 PM   #128
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I got "the Hobbit" from the dollar store, I think that was quite good despite gollum's appearence as a toad. I watch it every now and again. now LOTR

that's a different animal, it varies vastly, the ringwraiths I thought were well done... okay so that's about it. Now it wasn't because of bad effects (I love Godzilla effects aren't overly important) but I mean Boromir is a viking? Gimli is literally a garden gnome... an Aragorn looks like a native american(although that one seems fine to me seeing as he is a ranger still though.)The troll in moria belly bumps people. And most annoying Gollum;s speech is far too articulate.

I mean the orcs look cool and some of the styles are nice


OH! how could I forget what's up with Saruman the "red??" and his wacky LSD tower?

I mean I hate to say it but... I saw Fellowship of the ring and I wanted to read the book.

Had I saw this I would have avoided the book.

and someone mentioned Sam My friend and I watched the whole movie Just to laugh at him.
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Old 10-31-2009, 05:11 PM   #129
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I'm just watching the Bakshi film for the first time in about ten years or so (thanks to YouTube) and noticed a little detail I'd like to share.
During the scene of Gandalf's visit in Isengard, right before Gandalf and (S)Aruman have their light-show duel that ends with Gandalf being mysteriously teleported to the top of Orthanc, a vague figure steps in from the background to hand Saruman his staff. We don't get to see that figure clearly, as Saruman is obscuring our view of him, but we get a fleeting glimpse of somebody rather short in a dark, hooded cloak, the hood shadowing a pale, bloated face. I probably only recognized him because I've seen the whole film several times before, but with hindsight it's clear that this is Wormtongue.
Now I've been wondering for a while how Gandalf actually found out that Gríma was in Saruman's pay, and surmised he may have seen him in Isengard while he was imprisoned there, so I was quite delighted by this find. Shows that all the shortcomings of the film (which I won't deny) notwithstanding, Bakshi Beagle & Co. did give some thought to what they were doing, and I think it was rather nice of them to care about such a tiny detail as this.
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Old 11-01-2009, 06:17 AM   #130
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I first saw this film back in 1982 I think, either on video or terrestrial TV.

Back then, before the age of home computers, video games, sfx & cgi, I thought it was pretty good for what it was. Okay so the finished product was pretty poor compared to today's slick offerings,
Not to pick on you personally, but I've seen this kind of comment over and over again on this thread. The reality is that even in 1978 the consensus was that the Bakshi film was terrible. Nobody (over the age of about 12) thought that animation was any good back then either!

There were better animated films made in the 1930s! Check out "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" - 1937 - for an example of something done well 40 years before Bakshi's dire attempt.

In fact, it has only been in recent years that CGI has come to play a part in animated movies. For example, "The Lion King" - 1994 - is all "traditional" animation. CGI didn't become popular in animation until after "Toy Story" - 1995 - and of course that film is all CGI.

CGI in itself is not always that great ... I've seen shockingly bad CGI cartoons that were made for television just a few years ago.

Anyway, compare Bakshi's film to "The Lion King" ... both made using old school animation techniques. TLK looks fantastic and Bakshi's film looks like a mess. Even the early parts of Bakshi's film, the best looking parts, still have bad moments.

Frankly, Bakshi was just a lazy filmmaker. He had made two full-length animated movies before "The Lord of the Rings" - "Fritz the Cat" (which uses a kind of rotoscope technique since almost all the backgrounds are drawn over real footage of New York) and "Wizards" which is probably his best film.

"Wizards" is a fantasy/allegory set in a future world where old Nazi propaganda films fall into the hands of an evil wizard and he brings them to life with the power of magic. The climactic battle scene between the forces of good and evil was done with rotoscoping, in much the same way as "The Lord of the Rings", due to Bakshi running out of money. He commented "I thought that if we dropped all the detail, it would look very artistic, and very beautiful, and I felt, why bother animating all of this? I'm looking for a way to get realism into my film and get real emotion."

Unfortunately Bakshi is full of it. The rotoscoped animation in his films looks terrible ... and we thought it looked terrible in 1978. It was only done because of budget limitations and because Bakshi essentially couldn't be bothered animating his action sequences properly. It's really nothing to do with the "state of the art" of animation in the 1970s because these were low budget movies. As far as "The Return of the King" and "The Hobbit" go - they were low budget "made for television" movies aimed at children, not even "real" movies. At least the songs in "The Return of the King" are sort of amusing in a camp way if you don't take your Tolkien too seriously!

There are a few moments in Bakshi's "The Lord of the Rings" that are quite good. Some of the moments with The Black Riders, the famous shot of the Ring bouncing, the voice acting of the guy who portrays Gollum ... but they hardly make up for the awfulness of the rest of the film. As for Bakshi's film being "more faithful" to the books - well, it uses more actual dialogue from the books but it's hardly more faithful in any tangible way. Besides, it only goes to show how you can quote plenty of lines from a book and still make a terrible adaptation!

Lastly, John Hurt is a great actor but he is completely miscast as Aragorn.

Jackson's films have some shortcomings as adaptions - going to Osgiliath, dumbing down Saruman, using Gimli as comic-relief, trying to turn Aragorn into a main character and therefore saddling him with a stupid "arc", not developing Merry and Pippin properly, not understanding the point of the Scouring (and thus leaving it out) - but at least they are not badly made films. You can't point to CGI as some kind of saviour either, because there isn't that much CGI in the films. Most of the film uses real locations ... real sets (not green screen) ... detailed miniatures ... forced perspective to make the "hobbit actors" look smaller, thousands of extras. Gollum is the obvious exception, of course!

Naturally there are CGI elements inserted into various shots ... but compared to most modern films of this kind, not that many. It's one of the reasons why the film works well - even Gollum is played by a real actor, even if he has been painted out and replaced by a CGI character.

My main complaints about Jackson's films (other than the ones I listed earlier)?

1. Too much action and not enough suspense - the Black Riders are wonderfully ominous early on but once Aragorn waves some burning sticks at them they are not longer scary and the "action film" style kicks in.

2. Mordor should be scary as hell (literally) but instead is terribly anticlimactic once Frodo and Sam get there. It's just grey and boring. The film seems to have run out of steam by this point. This is partly down to the problem generated by the "too much action and not enough suspense" style of Jackson's direction. It's hard to believe that this is the same guy who directed the chilling "Heavenly Creatures"!

3. In the amount of time Jackson spends saying "goodbye" to the characters he could have given us a quick "Scouring". The Scouring of the Shire is essential for the character development of Merry and Pippin and would also have given a satisfactory sendoff to Saruman.
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Old 11-01-2009, 03:44 PM   #131
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I can't claim to be an expert on animation, so I won't go into the technical questions that POTH has commented on quite competently, as far as I can tell. From my point of view, the rotoscoping works best on such scenes as the early confrontations with the Black Riders, the fight with the Orcs in Moria and to some degree the tide of evil in the final battle at Helm's Deep, to which it lends a somewhat surreal, 'otherworldly' quality which I quite like; but I agree it gets rather weird in the second half of the film.
(Which reminds me - when I first saw the film in cinema back in the winter of 1978/79, I was on the eve of coming down with the flu and got rather feverish during the viewing, so I actually wondered how much of the weird visuals in the later half might be due to my rising temperature. A rather psychedelic experience!)
And Leonard Rosenman did a great job on the score, as far as I'm concerned. The main theme is touching and unforgettable, as are the dirge for Gandalf in Lothlórien and the choir in the final battle scenes (if you listen closely, you'll notice that for want of better lyrics, he had them chanting his own name backwards - 'Namnesor Dranoel'; quaint, but it works!).
As for Bakshi vs Jackson, I'll be the first to admit that PJ handled a number of things much better - such as presenting Boromir as a likeable character who just temporarily succumbed to a temptation to strong for him, and Sam as the hero he is rather than a comic potato. (Even the Rankin/Bass ROTK, abominable as it is in many aspects, brought out the heroic side of Sam better than Bakshi - but then again, we don't really get that much of that side of Sam in the parts of the book Bakshi covers.) I guess the root of all my qualms with PJ is that he came so damn close to getting it right in so many ways that it hurts all the more when he messes up and gets off on some completely gratuitous nonsensical tangent.
Which finally brings me to another point in favour of the animated versions (even the R/B ones, I'm afraid). All adaptations of a work of literature in a visual medium - whether mere illustration, animation or live action - influence and limit our own imagination of the characters and events to some degree; and just as illustrations are, in this respect, less 'harmful' than movies, animation is, in my subjective view, one step further removed from pretending to be 'the real thing' than live action, as we're more conscious of looking at everything through someone else's artistic filter.
Looking at it from a slightly different angle: Michael Moorcock, in his rather blasphemous essay on Tolkien 'Epic Pooh', claimed that Tolkien was so successful because we, the readers, are actually much better writers than the Professor himself was and make up for his literary shortcomings by the use of our own imaginations. This is not the thread to debate his statement as far as the books are concerned, but I think it applies to the films in a way: in our minds, we're all better film-makers than Bakshi, so we can flesh out the gaps and smooth out his mistakes while we're watching and still enjoy the show. With a live action movie like PJ's, we don't have that much leeway to exercise our own imagination, we depend more on the film-maker to get it right for us, and are more disappointed if he doesn't. Or that's how it seems to me.
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Old 11-04-2009, 03:14 PM   #132
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I guess the root of all my qualms with PJ is that he came so damn close to getting it right in so many ways that it hurts all the more when he messes up and gets off on some completely gratuitous nonsensical tangent.
Yes, I couldn't have said it better myself, Pitchwife! That is exactly my feeling.

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...in our minds, we're all better film-makers than Bakshi, so we can flesh out the gaps and smooth out his mistakes while we're watching and still enjoy the show. With a live action movie like PJ's, we don't have that much leeway to exercise our own imagination, we depend more on the film-maker to get it right for us, and are more disappointed if he doesn't. Or that's how it seems to me.
I think some of that is "animation vs. live action" ... but some of it is just "bad film maker vs. good film maker". There is no doubt that PJ is really good at making films, but he is a bit like Steven Spielberg in that his films look fantastic, but they sometimes lack a certain something. The lights are on but nobody is at home, so to speak. The appearance is there, but the substance is lacking, or wrong. PJ knows how to make films, that's for sure, but does he know how to make LOTR?

The problem is that because PJ is a good film maker, we are not left with much room to imagine our own version. He's already overloaded us with memorable visuals ...
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Old 11-22-2009, 09:34 AM   #133
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What do you think of the Bakshi cartoon?
I saw it when I was much younger. Technically it was interesting for its "cartoon drawn by tracing over live action film" method, which at the time was considered novel and quite innovative.

My main problem with the film was that, not having read the novel, the cartoon-film was confusing -- I couldn't follow who all the characters were and what they were doing, or why. But mostly what I hated about it was that it was a lie. It was entitled Lord of the Rings but it covered only about the first half of the novel.

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... the Elves were worse than I'd remembered. They weren't actually green, more like bluish-gray. Their bodies were squat but their legs were long. Their eyes were nothing short of evil and surly. They were balding, and the hair they had was wispy and stringly. Their hangs and feet were amphibian. They were butt-ugly. In short, they were the exact opposite of what Elves should look like. ... I'm wondering...does anyone know of a motivation for depicting the Elves this way? I mean, did the animators ever explain why the Elves were so unlike "real" Elves? Or were they, as others have suggested, just high?
It will be hard for most people today to understand, but our vision of elves today is largely formed by Lord of the Rings, in which Tolkien restored the original ideas of how the "elves of faerie" were portrayed in myth. What's hard to realize is how strongly the popular conception of elves had been shaped by hundreds of years of bad fairy tale and folklore caricature. Until Tolkien the popular conception of elves was more like the "Keebler elves" or "Santa's elves" -- leprechauns or wee Victorian pixie-fairies.

As a result, early artistic renderings of Tolkien's elves were often quite "off" from what we understand them to be today. An example was the first recording I had of The Lord of the Rings, a dramatic reading that was published in the 1970's by Jabberwocky Audio on cassette tape. It was very well produced, and a worthy effort... except for one thing: all the elves spoke with very high-pitched, falsetto "pixie" voices, more squeaky even than Minnie Mouse's.

Which was really too bad. The author of the script, who had done a very good job (for a BBC radio performance in 1954, I believe), must have had a fit if and when he heard the way these American actors portrayed his elves 20 years later. It was very funny, in a sad way.

This version was rereleased in 2001 on CD and is still available (photo below), unfortunately with the same squeaky elf voices.


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Old 11-22-2009, 12:21 PM   #134
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but our vision of elves today is largely formed by Lord of the Rings, in which Tolkien restored the original ideas of how the "elves of faerie" were portrayed in myth.
Or so he claimed. For an interesting discussion of the differences between Tolkien's Elves and the elves/fairies of traditional folk mythology, see this thread (one of my personal all-times favourites).
Horrible as the Rankin/Bass elves are as depictions of Tolkien's Quendi, their look somehow suggests a glimpse of the dark and malicious side (if not the dangerous beauty) of traditional fairies.
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Old 11-23-2009, 07:53 PM   #135
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This is not the thread to debate his statement as far as the books are concerned, but I think it applies to the films in a way: in our minds, we're all better film-makers than Bakshi, so we can flesh out the gaps and smooth out his mistakes while we're watching and still enjoy the show. With a live action movie like PJ's, we don't have that much leeway to exercise our own imagination, we depend more on the film-maker to get it right for us, and are more disappointed if he doesn't. Or that's how it seems to me.
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The problem is that because PJ is a good film maker, we are not left with much room to imagine our own version. He's already overloaded us with memorable visuals ...
Hardly fair as a criticism, though, is it? I've heard this argument before, and it strikes me as a little, well, perverse almost. However, I'd agree that it probably explains why people spend more time nitpicking the live-action films.
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Old 11-30-2009, 04:22 AM   #136
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Or so he claimed. ... Horrible as the Rankin/Bass elves are as depictions of Tolkien's Quendi, their look somehow suggests a glimpse of the dark and malicious side (if not the dangerous beauty) of traditional fairies.
Yes, the earlier view of faeries did portray "the other" according to the worst instincts of xenophobic racial hatred that came largely from the infusions of Germanic myth into English culture that occurred during the Saxon invasions.

But I was talking of physical characteristics of elves, Tolkien's reversal of the infantilizing of their appearance that occurred during the Victorian era. Before that they at least looked mostly human in size, stature and form.
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Old 12-24-2009, 06:27 PM   #137
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I have always loved this oddly inspiring film- the vivid and almost supernatural imagery it offered, and John Hurt's voice!

Those Ringwraiths were far more sinister than the LoTR trilogy's, IMHO?

This film (especially the last battle), Michael Wood and Excalibur (1981) got me gripped by history!
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:24 AM   #138
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Couldn't figure out why Peter Jackson's LotR was playing yet again on the TV this weekend. Then I saw an ad, showing that it's being released (or re-released, or re-re-released...I'm already losing count) on Blu-Ray DVD. Then I saw something even more interesting (or scary, depending on your point of view) - the Bakshi version is coming out on DVD and Blu-Ray as well!

You can read a short blurb about it here.

Anyone buying it?
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Old 04-05-2010, 09:08 AM   #139
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I bought the Bakshi cartoon on DVD a few years ago, out of a sense of nostalgia. I see no reason to spend more on the Blu-Ray. I shudder to think what all that rotoscoped animation would look like on High-def.
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Old 04-11-2010, 01:34 PM   #140
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Lets put it this way, If I had a little bit of cash, I would buy up the Bakshi film, knock off the last minute or so then finish it with another 90 minutes.

Of course Id have to revoice some of the dialogue, actors dying and so forth to have the new sound fit in with continuing characters with what went on before. But as far as the animation, characters, men without pants, barbie Gladreal, etc I’d keep it as faithful as possible to the original, warts and for continuity. It’s Lord of the Rings and no one else at the time was ambitious enough to take on that project.
Actually, I've given thought to something like this. Setting aside issues of copyright, etc., I wonder how hard it would be using modern computers and editing software to do what SteamChip suggests? In other words, it could almost be something someone does as a hobby in their spare time, rather than a huge dedicated project, requiring a massive investment in personnel, time, and resources.

For example, wouldn't some sort of graphics software allow one to correct such things as Aragorn's pantlessness, Saruman's weird robe, Boromir's horned helmet, etc.? Likewise, with sound editing, even using the existing dialogue, it ought to be possible to splice in or otherwise correct little things like "Aruman" or Boromir's pronunciation of MI-NUS Tirith.

Going beyond this, is it technically possible to take, say, simple film footage of individuals doing a scene, and use graphics software to overlay the animation characters over the actors? I ask because this would point the way to filming whole new scenes as SteamChip posted. One could recruit interested individuals from anywhere in the world to send in even camera phone footage to use as a basis for the animation.

Or even going well beyond this - rather than merely finishing the movie, one could add in missing scenes that fans have griped about for years, such as the Old Forest, Bombadil, and the Barrow Downs, among others. Remember that such would be an individual fan project, and need not be dumbed down to cater to the lowest denominator. The only stumbling blocks I foresee here are having to redo the voice acting throughout (for continuity), and any background music (though for the latter, were I in a particularly "pirate" mood, I'd go ahead and take anything whether from the original Bakshi movie, PJ's flicks, or even other music by, say, Enya, that would fit into the mood of the scene)

Now, I do not know if what I suggest is necessarily technically possible in the manner I outline above, and would need input from others far more knowledgeable about these things, but given the raw computing power that exists today (considering that what we currently have in a laptop vastly exceeds in power what NASA filled rooms with back when the Bakshi movie was released) coupled with the straightforward animation (as opposed to say Pixar style high end animation) it seems hard to believe that it couldn't be done...

Just a thought I've had for a number of years, now.
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Old 05-02-2010, 05:07 AM   #141
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I enjoyed it when I was eight, but after I watched it again at sixteen I wasn't very impressed. Bakshi didn't even bother to look at the back of the book to see the 'pronunciations' section. Celeborn is pronounced as 'Seleborn'. Sauron is pronounced as 'Sauuuron'.

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Old 04-23-2011, 03:45 AM   #142
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Bakshi

I also saw this early on so it had some influence on my own imagination's creation of the characters as I read the original and heard the 1981 BBC dramatisation. It does have some good dark/evil atmosphere, and the way Gandalf was drawn was how I will always imagine him (well what I remember of the cartoon is how my imagination depicts him). But no on the whole it is terrible. Willow probably more influenced my imagination of Lord of the Rings, the small village with very little knowledge or influence in the greater world of men, and Willow and his friend who sticks around a while is pretty much how I imagine Frodo and Sam, albeit with the voices of Ian Holm and William Nighy.
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Old 04-24-2011, 06:09 AM   #143
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The cartoons was an abomination. Sam looked mentally deficient, and I really mean that, he looked simple. Saruman sounded like a common pervert, hanging outside the toilets to offer kids some candy. There was nothing in Saruman that suggested the sheer power of his oratory skills.

The 'battles' were hideous. I fast forwarded through them all. The best I can say for this steaming pile of crap is that Gandalf's voice was not terrible. Nowhere near as good as Sir Ian McKellen, but acceptable.

Overall it was a disgusting, hideous production that died a lousy slow death right before my very eyes. I just felt myself scowling harder and harder as I watched it until I wanted to spit at the screen. Truly awful.

As bad as Santa With Muscles. Just reflect on that for a moment.
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Old 04-24-2011, 06:03 PM   #144
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The cartoons was an abomination. Sam looked mentally deficient, and I really mean that, he looked simple. Saruman sounded like a common pervert, hanging outside the toilets to offer kids some candy. There was nothing in Saruman that suggested the sheer power of his oratory skills.

The 'battles' were hideous. I fast forwarded through them all. The best I can say for this steaming pile of crap is that Gandalf's voice was not terrible. Nowhere near as good as Sir Ian McKellen, but acceptable.

Overall it was a disgusting, hideous production that died a lousy slow death right before my very eyes. I just felt myself scowling harder and harder as I watched it until I wanted to spit at the screen. Truly awful.

As bad as Santa With Muscles. Just reflect on that for a moment.
So, what you're saying is that you didn't care for the cartoon? I just want to make sure before passing any judgment on your comments. After all, it's so difficult to ascertain people's true feelings on the Internet.
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Old 04-24-2011, 06:16 PM   #145
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So, what you're saying is that you didn't care for the cartoon? I just want to make sure before passing any judgment on your comments. After all, it's so difficult to ascertain people's true feelings on the Internet.
I hate it. I think it's an insult to the work of Tolkien.
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Old 04-24-2011, 07:02 PM   #146
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I hate it. I think it's an insult to the work of Tolkien.
Oh. Well then, there you have it.

I take a far more sympathetic view to the project, particularly in consideration for Bakshi's difficulty in funding the project. Not great, but not as terrible as the Rankin-Bass debacle ("Frod-o-o-o-o-o of the nine fingers!" *retches*) And I have been in possession of twelve of the orginal theater marquee placards for the past 30 years or so. They are quite marvelous looking. Perhaps I'll take them out of their folio sleeves and have them framed some day.
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Old 04-24-2011, 07:33 PM   #147
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The movie definitely has its flaws, but at least Bakshi was true to the book in one crucial respect: Arwen speaks not at all.
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Old 04-30-2011, 10:25 AM   #148
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The movie definitely has its flaws, but at least Bakshi was true to the book in one crucial respect: Arwen speaks not at all.
Poor little Glorfy doesn't speak either
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Old 01-01-2013, 05:41 AM   #149
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I love Bakshi's cartoon. Maybe it's a nostalgic thing because it is what got me into Tolkien, but I hold it dear in my heart
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Old 01-01-2013, 08:22 AM   #150
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I think you guys might like a completely re-dubbed version of Bakshi's LOTR opus that was quite popular on Youtube before they took it down back in 2008. Though now that it's reuploaded (and complete) I thought it might be fun to share.

http://youtu.be/M1x3XkHs-BE

Yeah, I didn't particularly think the adaptation was that great (Bakshi's version), but the intent and attempt is quite commendable.
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Old 01-01-2013, 09:03 AM   #151
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Just got to say, rotoscope wasn't innovative, it was invented way back in 1915 and was used extensively in the industry, including in Disney's Snow White which people often hold up as a great example of animation. So that wasn't the 'issue' with the film. Nor was Bakshi - he's actually really good, and any other fan of the late 60s Spider-Man cartoons will agree. I grew up on those and the little guy also loves them (thanks to me finding the DVDs in Poundland of all places).

But I saw the Bakshi cartoon at completely the wrong time. In the mid-80s. By then I was well aware that some kind of live action version was perfectly possible as ITV was showing Robin Of Sherwood which was just superb (and still is). An animation with Aragorn in undies wasn't going to cut it for me. And the Hobbits were totally wrong; then as now my benchmark is always the Hobbits. If they look like Tyrion Lannister, garden gnomes or horrible fantasy ornaments that your nan bought from a gift shop in Cleethorpes then it's something I don't want to see, thanks.

However, nowadays, I can enjoy it. Not just because Bakshi did my favourite Spider-Man cartoons, but because it's a kitsch classic. I rank it with Flash Gordon (saw this last night again - it's epic), Barbarella, Blake's 7, something from the decades when sf/fantasy was all about being fun and colourful and bizarre.
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Old 01-02-2013, 05:23 AM   #152
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It was the movie that made me read the book.

I did get a chill and so on from the Black Riders.

I like how it has the dark, grim feel to it. But when you watch it older nowadays, you see the flaws. Spastic Sam, Aragorn Native American.......
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Old 01-04-2013, 08:39 AM   #153
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Saw it on DvD yesterday here in OZ as part of my B'Day present stuff. Lol, didn't ask for it though. Seen it enough.

Gandalf was perfect though! Very stern and true to the books up through Moria. Saw one YouTube comment that grabbed my attention though; that he touched Pippin inappropriately on the face in Moria. Lol! Will always remember Aragorn as having John Hurt's voice. And of course.....Legolas bumped Glorfindel, as usual.

It's like film makers have it in for him!

If there's a new attempt to make TLotR, I SWEAR, I will send a letter/email to beg them to include Glorfindel.
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